maintenance

I Owe my Soul to West Marine…

I posted this to my sailing groups… But not publically. A Maness Original, with profound apologies to Tennessee Ernie Ford.

(To the tune of 16 Tons)

maintenanceSome people see a sailor, say he’s got it good
Poor sailor spends his life misunderstood
It looks so easy when the sunny wind blows
But there’s a hole in the water where his money goes

You fix sixteen holes, what do you get
The boat’s still leakin’ and the bilge is still wet
I’ve spent more money than you’ve ever seen
I owe my soul to West Marine.

I started one mornin’ when the sun didn’t shine
Signed all the papers and the sailboat was mine
Untied from the pier, sailed out for the bay
The curse was on me from the very first day

You fix sixteen holes, what do you get
The boat’s still leakin’ and the bilge is still wet
I’ve spent more money than you’ve ever seen
I owe my soul to West Marine.

The wind started howling, it was a rising gale
It blew right through all of my brand new sails
Thought I’d be alright but I was going too slow
There was three feet of water when I looked below

You fix sixteen holes, what do you get
The boat’s still leakin’ and the bilge is still wet
I’ve spent more money than you’ve ever seen
I owe my soul to West Marine.

Now she’s lyin on the bottom, my heart just sank
But I’ll bring her up again, another loan from the bank
When you see me coming, man toss me a line
Cause I don’t have a dime I can still call mine

You fix sixteen holes, what do you get
The boat’s still leakin’ and the bilge is still wet
I’ve spent more money than you’ve ever seen
I owe my soul to West Marine.

— Capt. Bill Maness, SV Shindyah

maintenance

Winter is coming…

Laura and I began to notice that the main salon heat wasn’t quite keeping up. Knowing that we’ve been relying on the reverse-cycle from our two air-conditioning systems, I suspected that the water temperature had finally fallen low enough that they were no longer efficient.

Winter is coming...
Winter is coming…

Well then. That’s the end of that. We just shut down the reverse cycle heat pumps and have turned on the basic oil-filled electric heaters. We’ll see how it goes. If you don’t hear from us before spring… Well, you know what happened.

maintenance

Maintenance… Filters filters and more filters…

We had a minor diesel leak in our Racor fuel filter/water-separator… By minor, I mean a drip every couple minutes.  It was gradually getting worse. We couldn’t figure out where it was coming from, so took the whole thing off the bulkhead and did a proper rebuild.  So glad we did! The paper filter was saturated.  O-rings (the source of the leak) had degraded into little rigid lumps.  Cleaned it out, put a new paper filter in, and got it all back together.  fuelfilterDid the air conditioning (heater at the moment) raw-water filter while we were there.  All and all, a successful day in the engine room. Laura has mad #KayleeSkills.  Great in the engine-room on her own, or as an extremely capable assistant.  It’s awesome.img_0054

 

maintenance

Yacht potato, yacht potato…

So…

Here we are… Pleasant evening indeed at the Inn at Pirate’s Cove… A walk out to the committee platform, watching the stars go by… We come back to the boat (I’ve thoughtfully turned on the foredeck light) and my lovely lady Laura says to me, “Hey… Are those spider webs up there? I look up the mast, and sure enough, cobwebs between the mast and shrouds.

DAMN I need to get this girl out of the slip…

Yacht potato, yacht potato….

 

maintenance

On Rodneys…

rodneyLaura and I often refer to “Rodney” or “Damn Rodneys” much to the confusion of our lubberly friends.  The term is most often applied to careless power-boaters, blasting through moorages at 20 knots, kicking up tsunami-like wakes that shake every boat they pass.  The term comes from the movie Caddyshack…  Where Rodney Dangerfield has a particularly memorable scene trying to control his behemoth yacht.   The clip is provided below.

If you find yourself being referred to as a Rodney (and your name isn’t Rodney) make amends quick, or you’ll find yourself buying your own beers.

Rodney Takes Command

 

maintenance

Boat for sale – and it’s YOUR vessel, two owners ago

Boat curiosity leads one to strange waters, especially when wanting to make modifications.

We plan to update Shindyah’s cove stripe to burgundy.  Along with adding a linen coloured Bimini and canoe for the sail.  I very much want to upgrade her wheel to a wooden one with knee knockers.  Bill and I are also looking to add a teak sole to the cockpit.  We feel that the linen Sunbrella colour would compliment the classic feel we are after.

I’ve been quite curious about what our boat, Shindyah, looked like straight from Catalina in 1991.  We know that our current table is not from the manufacturer.  How did the salon look then, compared to now; what has changed besides the beautiful inlay Compass Rose table we have now?

To Google!

Bill and I looked at pictures of various Morgan Classic and Out Island models.  Then, we came across an image that was strangely familiar.

1991 Morgan Classic 41' boat - salon

Then we realised.  It’s our boat!

Sailboat for sale

Hakuna Matata - 1991 Morgan Classic 41' boat

Meet Shindyah, two owners ago – as Hakuna Matata.  The bell was above the ship clock, rather than above the light right above the port settee.  Even the television was the same.  We’ve recently updated the TV of course, to a newer HDLCD version and the older, and ditched the Black & Decker coffee pot for a Keurig.  The appliance stopped working properly a couple of months ago. Coffee is a must!

 

maintenance

The charms of salt life and living aboard a sailboat

Salt life = thinking small.

One must always keep this in mind when living aboard a boat.  You only have so much space.  One learns how to become more organized.  Being great at Tetris is a huge help.  Especially when your ice box isn’t the same size as the one you’d have in a house.  You learn what is essential versus what is trivial, like all those chachkies littering the mantle in a house.  One of the hardest things for my honey to give up has been his books.  Yay for the iPad and Kindle app!  Still, being able to thumb through a book, the feel of the pages, and the scent of old paper can’t be duplicated with a device.

Salt life = serenity.

On those fantastically excellent days, you can pull up your lines and head out for the day.  No need to drive to the marina, you’re already on the boat.  The peacefulness of a marina in the off-season is beautiful.   The sound of the water slapping against the hull can be a sweet lullaby, and floating wind chime farm can be as well – as long as it isn’t YOUR halyard slapping against the mast.  Having the opportunity to look up, whilst laying in bed, looking at the stars through the cabin hatch is amazing.  Even more so, when doing this, you catch sight of a shooting star.  Needless to say, I don’t want to live on land for an extended period again.

Salt life = adventure.

Living aboard a sailing vessel isn’t always glamourous.  Think about it.  If you’ve ever traveled in a motorhome, it can be quite similar.  Banging doors, rattling dishes, and of course the inevitable slamming of tool boxes when an overly excited wake of a Rodney comes up suddenly.  Not to mention the whole ‘what is that funky smell emanating from the head?!’.